Random Musings

Intrigued by art, design, fashion, history and beauty.

livefromthecoast:

#fields - by #kentadreasen / #encore / #southafrica - #youth

livefromthecoast:

#fields - by #kentadreasen / #encore / #southafrica - #youth

(via racework)

— 7 hours ago with 10 notes
younggiftedharlem:

Two Black boy teens in Patterson, NJ. June 1974.

Author, Danny Lyons.

younggiftedharlem:

Two Black boy teens in Patterson, NJ. June 1974.

Author, Danny Lyons.

(via racework)

— 7 hours ago with 7 notes
vintagegal:

Arlene Hawkins photographed by Eve Arnold. Harlem, 1968 (x)

vintagegal:

Arlene Hawkins photographed by Eve Arnold. Harlem, 1968 (x)

(via vintagenoire)

— 7 hours ago with 1224 notes
africashowboy:

Let the child be a child. Photo by Nana Kofi Acquah @africashowboy (Copyright: 2014).

africashowboy:

Let the child be a child. Photo by Nana Kofi Acquah @africashowboy (Copyright: 2014).

(via afroklectic)

— 7 hours ago with 19 notes

yagazieemezi:

Laurent Elie Badessi traveled to Niger, Africa in 1987 and 1988 to photograph indigenous tribes for his Master’s Degree thesis project entitled “Ethnological Fashion Photography”. His goal was to study the impact of photography on natives from different ethnical groups, some of who had never (or very rarely) been exposed to this medium. The psychological aspect in the interaction that occurs between a photographer and his sitter during a photo session was also a focal point in his research.

For this undertaking, Badessi adopted the method of “La photographie négociée” (the Negotiated Photography), introduced to him by his teacher photographer Michel Séméniako. Badessi was seduced by this method and decided to use it here, because it allows the sitter to determine most of the parameters for a photo session that captures his/her image. In this case: the pose, the clothes, the make-up, the accessories, the time of day and the location. To make these sittings playful, he decided to use an element specific to human kind—clothing—as the main source of interaction between him and the autochthones.

For his research to be pertinent, Badessi decided to stay extended periods of time with each different ethnicity to better appreciate their culture. He and his team lived with the following ethnicities all across the country: the Haoussas, the Bororo (Wodaabe), the Kanouris, the Gourmances, the Djemmas, the Beri Beris and the Touareg.

The experience with the Bororo happened to be one of the greatest highlights of the project. Because they worship beauty, this highly nomadic group was particularly drawn to the “magic” and playfulness of having their photo taken.

Photography was totally foreign to this group of Bororo. To familiarize them with the medium, Badessi started taking Polaroid of his teammates, so they could see and understand its process. Little by little they became more comfortable with the team and expressed an increasing curiosity towards the “magic box” known to us as the camera. This particular group of about 100 nomads had only seen their image as a reflection of themselves into the water or in the mirror. When Badessi took their photo on Polaroid, he had to explain what to look for on the image–their face, their hat, their accessories, et cetera. Appearing so small wasn’t rational to them. It was total magic, because they were used to see their reflection as a life-size image, but not as a “tiny person” on a small piece a paper! Once they were able to recognize themselves, they laughed and placed the Polaroid over their heart. It was very emotional to see how touched they were and how precious the Polaroid became to them.

The photo sessions were a success and they became an integral part of the Bororo’s daily routine. After the cores, they could not wait to get ready for the sittings.

As Badessi mentions in his thesis, “we were in symbiosis with them, as much as they were with us. They were excited to have visitors and to share these great moments together. It was very inspirational to look at them getting ready. Somehow it was a meditative experience for us, because they took their time, you did not feel the constant pressure of the clock ticking in the back of your head, like we do in our culture, especially in big megalopolises. They totally lived in harmony with Mother Nature and respected her rhythm.” (Keep reading)

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

— 19 hours ago with 356 notes
likeafieldmouse:

Hans Silvester - More from the Natural Fashion series (2006-7)

likeafieldmouse:

Hans Silvester - More from the Natural Fashion series (2006-7)

(via neexbeing)

— 23 hours ago with 3542 notes
2manysiblings:

RED LIGHTS & FLOWERS. ( joe were, 2014 )

2manysiblings:

RED LIGHTS & FLOWERS.
( joe were, 2014 )

(via exiledpoetssociety)

— 23 hours ago with 145 notes
brandonousley:

Marvin Gaye. Jim Britt. 1974. 

brandonousley:

Marvin Gaye. Jim Britt. 1974. 

(via theawesomefarm)

— 23 hours ago with 1850 notes
miss-jalexander:

Leap into new heights for tonight’s episode #antm is on NOW! #topmodel #missj #cycle21 — who do you want to be sent home??? http://ift.tt/1y9d75s

miss-jalexander:

Leap into new heights for tonight’s episode #antm is on NOW! #topmodel #missj #cycle21 — who do you want to be sent home??? http://ift.tt/1y9d75s

— 23 hours ago with 9 notes
vintageblackglamour:

A member of the African Choir, London Stereoscopic Company, 1891. From The Guardian:
The African Choir were a group of young South African singers that toured Britain between 1891 and 1893. They were formed to raise funds for a Christian school in their home country and performed for Queen Victoria at Osborne House, a royal residence on the Isle of Wight. At some point during their stay, they visited the studio of the London Stereoscopic Company to have group and individual portraits made on plate-glass negatives. That long-lost series of photographs, unseen for 120 years, is the dramatic centrepiece of an illuminating new exhibition called Black Chronicles II.
Photo: Hulton Archive/Getty Images

vintageblackglamour:

A member of the African Choir, London Stereoscopic Company, 1891. From The Guardian:

The African Choir were a group of young South African singers that toured Britain between 1891 and 1893. They were formed to raise funds for a Christian school in their home country and performed for Queen Victoria at Osborne House, a royal residence on the Isle of Wight. At some point during their stay, they visited the studio of the London Stereoscopic Company to have group and individual portraits made on plate-glass negatives. That long-lost series of photographs, unseen for 120 years, is the dramatic centrepiece of an illuminating new exhibition called Black Chronicles II.

Photo: Hulton Archive/Getty Images

— 23 hours ago with 569 notes