Random Musings

Intrigued by art, design, fashion, history and beauty.

fuckyeahblackcinema:

Behind the Scenes

A Day in the Life of Tim Friday (2013)
Dir: Corey Davis
Writer: Sean Fahie

(via blackfilm)

— 3 hours ago with 103 notes
you know what's crazy? →

palmares-politics:

once upon a time i studied civil engineering.

i was the only black civil engineer in my class.

i was excommunicated by my anti-black classmates as they excluded me from their network of studying and cheating, i was called lazy by professors who were supposed to support me as i went above and…

— 3 hours ago with 73 notes
streetetiquette:

On the way up • building with @awolerizku + @meloxtra in BedStuy

streetetiquette:

On the way up • building with @awolerizku + @meloxtra in BedStuy

— 13 hours ago with 167 notes

Isamu Noguchi did not draw a distinction between formal sculpture and functional forms; he approached both in a similar way. This cast iron bowl is a deceptively simple example of the play between the silhouette and the void.

Isamu Noguchi did not draw a distinction between formal sculpture and functional forms; he approached both in a similar way. This cast iron bowl is a deceptively simple example of the play between the silhouette and the void.

(Source: s-c-r-a-p-b-o-o-k, via thegiftsoflife)

— 16 hours ago with 190 notes

hifructosemag:

Kehinde Wiley’s (Hi-Fructose Vol. 29) opulent portraiture subtly stirs the status quo. As an American artist, Wiley honed his craft in accordance with a legacy of Euro-centric art history that left him simultaneously awed and alienated. One would be hard-pressed to find a grandiose portrait of a person of color in the works of the Renaissance masters in the Met or the Louvre. This is the motivating factor of Wiley’s oeuvre: to elevate images of average people of African descent through his ornate depictions, exposing the singular beauty of his subjects through dramatic compositions that evoke the Baroque period.

While he started out this aesthetic exploration by scouting subjects in major US cities, Wiley’s art has taken him all over the world to work with people of the global African diaspora. His latest series, “The World Stage: Haiti” is currently on view at Roberts & Tilton Gallery in Culver City and features 12 new paintings based on his recent travels. Read more on Hi-Fructose

(via bekkethatsall)

— 16 hours ago with 611 notes